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  • Home > Australia Airlines > Virgin Blue

    Virgin Blue

    Content: Virgin Blue - Virgin Blue Ticket - Virgin Blue Check In - Virgin Blue Flights - Virgin Blue Booking - Virgin Blue Route Map - Virgin Blue Timetable - Virgin Blue Offices - About Virgin Blue - Virgin Blue Flight Status - Baggage Allowance - Fares - Prices - Address - Phone Number - Careers - Passenger Information



    Virgin Blue

    Virgin Blue

  • Virgin Blue Official Site

    You can find all (flight status, destinations, booking, check in, baggage allowance, contact, adress, phone number, route map, fleet, timetable, flights, ticket, fares, route map, offices, careers) about Virgin Blue in official site of Virgin Blue. Please click the link above for visiting Virgin Blue site.




  • Virgin Blue Timetable

    You can view current timetable for Virgin Blue.


  • Virgin Blue Timetable



  • Virgin Blue Route Map

    You can see all destinations of Virgin Blue on the route map.


  • Virgin Blue Route Map



    Virgin Blue Destinations

    This is a list of destinations served by the Virgin Blue group (Virgin Blue, Pacific Blue and Polynesian Blue) as of July 2009. This does not include destinations only served by V Australia.

    Asia

    Oceania


    About Virgin Blue:

    Virgin Blue Logo Virgin Blue is an Australian low-cost airline, Australia's second-biggest airline as well as the largest by fleet size to utilise the Virgin brand. It was founded by British businessman Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group and is based in Brisbane, Australia.

    Virgin Blue was launched on 31 August 2000, with two 737-400 aircraft leased from then sister airline Virgin Express which initially offered seven return flights a day between Brisbane and Sydney. This has since been expanded to cover all major Australian cities and many holiday destinations.

    The timing of Virgin Blue's entry into the Australian market was fortunate as it was able to fill the vacuum created by the failure of Ansett Australia in September 2001. Ansett's failure allowed Virgin Blue to grow rapidly to become Australia's second domestic carrier, rather than just a cut-price alternative to the established players. It also gave them access to terminal space without which growth would have been significantly limited. Delays in negotiating access to the former Ansett terminal at Sydney Airport however forced Virgin Blue to use their original terminal there longer than was needed.

    As the airline grew, it acquired new equipment, enabling it to phase-out its older loaned 737-400s for 737NG's (-700 and -800) series jets with modern glass cockpits, winglets and fuel efficiency. Following Ansetts demise, the airline increased its fleet rapidly as a result.

    Virgin Group's holding in Virgin Blue has since been reduced, initially via a sale of a half interest to Australian logistics conglomerate Patrick Corporation, and later by a public float. In early 2005 Patrick launched a hostile takeover for Virgin Blue. Patrick had been unhappy for some time with the company's direction. By the closure of the offer, Patrick held 62% of the company, giving it control. Virgin Group retains a 25% share. In May 2006 Toll Holdings acquired Patrick and became the majority owner of Virgin Blue. In July 2008 Toll sold its majority holding via a special dividend and now holds 1.7% of the company.

    Virgin Blue uses a familiar formula pioneered by airlines such as Southwest Airlines and Ryanair eliminating costs such as included in-flight meals and printed tickets in favour of selling food on-board and using telephone and internet booking systems. It also cut costs in the past by limiting the number of airports serviced and by operating one type of aircraft, the Boeing 737. This strategy has now changed with the introduction of a second type into the fleet. The airline has ordered 20 Embraer E-jets, in a mix of six ERJ-170s and 14 ERJ-190s, with the intent of taking as many as another 20 aircraft. These were ordered specifically so that the airline could re-enter the Sydney�Canberra market that it abandoned in 2004, and to fly to other destinations with less traffic. The first ERJ-170 arrived in Australia in September 2007 and by the end of the year the three on initial order had been delivered. These were placed on limited-frequency services before full-scale operations were launched on 4 February 2008 with services from Sydney to Canberra (branded as 'Capital Jet' services), Mackay in Queensland, and the New South Wales regional centres of Port Macquarie and Albury. A one-cent fare was used to promote the Port Macquarie and Albury services. The flights to Canberra and the regional centres signify an effort to compete more directly with Qantas and its subsidiary QantasLink operation, which flies to all three cities, with independent Regional Express Airlines, which flies to Albury, caught in the middle.

    In September 2003, Virgin Blue announced that its wholly owned subsidiary Pacific Blue would offer a similar cheaper service between New Zealand and mainland Australia. Pacific Blue aims to position itself as a low-cost competitor to Air New Zealand and Qantas on trans-Tasman routes. Air New Zealand also had a low-cost airline Freedom Air (which ceased operations in March 2008) and Qantas deployed Jetstar on selected New Zealand routes. Both Qantas (and its wholly owned New Zealand subsidiary Jetconnect operating as a Qantas branded franchise) and Air New Zealand continue to operate these routes in their own right. In August 2007, Virgin Blue announced their intention to begin domestic Pacific Blue services within New Zealand. Flights between Auckland and Wellington, Christchurch and Wellington, and Auckland and Christchurch, began on 12 November 2007.

    As the airline grew, it acquired new equipment, enabling it to phase-out its older loaned 737-400s for 737NG's (-700 and -800) series jets with modern glass cockpits, winglets and fuel efficiency. Following Ansetts demise, the airline increased its fleet rapidly as a result.

    Virgin Group's holding in Virgin Blue has since been reduced, initially via a sale of a half interest to Australian logistics conglomerate Patrick Corporation, and later by a public float. In early 2005 Patrick launched a hostile takeover for Virgin Blue. Patrick had been unhappy for some time with the company's direction. By the closure of the offer, Patrick held 62% of the company, giving it control. Virgin Group retains a 25% share. In May 2006 Toll Holdings acquired Patrick and became the majority owner of Virgin Blue. In July 2008 Toll sold its majority holding via a special dividend and now holds 1.7% of the company.

    Virgin Blue uses a familiar formula pioneered by airlines such as Southwest Airlines and Ryanair eliminating costs such as included in-flight meals and printed tickets in favour of selling food on-board and using telephone and internet booking systems. It also cut costs in the past by limiting the number of airports serviced and by operating one type of aircraft, the Boeing 737. This strategy has now changed with the introduction of a second type into the fleet. The airline has ordered 20 Embraer E-jets, in a mix of six ERJ-170s and 14 ERJ-190s, with the intent of taking as many as another 20 aircraft. These were ordered specifically so that the airline could re-enter the Sydney�Canberra market that it abandoned in 2004, and to fly to other destinations with less traffic. The first ERJ-170 arrived in Australia in September 2007 and by the end of the year the three on initial order had been delivered. These were placed on limited-frequency services before full-scale operations were launched on 4 February 2008 with services from Sydney to Canberra (branded as 'Capital Jet' services), Mackay in Queensland, and the New South Wales regional centres of Port Macquarie and Albury. A one-cent fare was used to promote the Port Macquarie and Albury services. The flights to Canberra and the regional centres signify an effort to compete more directly with Qantas and its subsidiary QantasLink operation, which flies to all three cities, with independent Regional Express Airlines, which flies to Albury, caught in the middle.

    In September 2003, Virgin Blue announced that its wholly owned subsidiary Pacific Blue would offer a similar cheaper service between New Zealand and mainland Australia. Pacific Blue aims to position itself as a low-cost competitor to Air New Zealand and Qantas on trans-Tasman routes. Air New Zealand also had a low-cost airline Freedom Air (which ceased operations in March 2008) and Qantas deployed Jetstar on selected New Zealand routes. Both Qantas (and its wholly owned New Zealand subsidiary Jetconnect operating as a Qantas branded franchise) and Air New Zealand continue to operate these routes in their own right. In August 2007, Virgin Blue announced their intention to begin domestic Pacific Blue services within New Zealand. Flights between Auckland and Wellington, Christchurch and Wellington, and Auckland and Christchurch, began on 12 November 2007.

    Qantas responded to Virgin Blue's lower cost base by creating a new low-cost domestic carrier, Jetstar Airways, in 2004. In May 2005 Jetstar announced that it would also commence services to Christchurch, New Zealand, and in 2006 many other overseas destinations.

    At its inception in 2000, Virgin Blue did not have interline or marketing alliances with any other airline. The first exception to this was after the collapse of its domestic competitor Ansett where it began a codeshare agreement with United Airlines, which having lost its Star Alliance feed into Australia through Ansett, allowed United customers to fly from America to any of Virgin Blue's Australian destinations that United did not already serve. In 2006, in an effort to be more competitive with rival Qantas, Virgin Blue started exploring these relationships, forming frequent flyer agreements with Emirates Airline, Hawaiian Airlines and Malaysia Airlines. Virgin Blue also has an Airline Agreement with Regional Express Airlines for travellers to and from smaller regional centres. In November 2007, the airline announced an interline deal with international carrier Garuda Indonesia, offering easy transfer from a domestic Virgin Blue flight to an international Garuda service departing from Perth, Melbourne, Sydney or Darwin. Recently, Virgin Blue has announced an interline agreement with Vietnam Airlines which allows passengers to fly from Melbourne and Sydney to Ho Chi Minh City, then transfer easily to any of the 41 international and 18 domestic destinations served by Vietnam Airlines.

    In 2008, the carrier introduced Premium Economy Class throughout its entire fleet. This involved new seating being installed in the first three rows of the cabin which could be converted from three seats in main cabin configuration to two seats with fold-down table in the middle for premium use, with greater seat pitch and legroom. The premium product offers priority check-in, larger baggage allowance, lounge access, priority boarding, and free in flight entertainment and meals/beverages on board. The product is aimed at attracting more business and corporate market to the carrier.

    The airline began charging for checked baggage for Economy Class in September 2008.

    Virgin Blue's name was the result of an open competition; it is a play on the predominantly red livery and the Australian slang tradition of calling a red-headed male 'Blue' or 'Bluey'. (Source: Wikipedia - 2009)



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